having apparently forgotten

having apparently forgotten your true nature - pen and pencil - 29apr15 - words from Rupert Spira - drawing by Melinda Blair Paterson - 29apr15
having apparently forgotten your true nature – pen and pencil – 29apr15 – words from Rupert Spira – drawing by Melinda Blair Paterson

Some days seem to be full of pointers, don’t they? Today’s pointers were – remember and return to the truth of ‘who you are’.

My early morning was spent catching up on some emails and blogs, one of which is Dhamma Footsteps by Tiramit. It’s a wonderful series of postcards from a Scotsman living overseas in various parts of Asia. His awareness and sharing of the ordinariness of life brings a smile to heart. So I like to wait until I have the space, quiet and presence to read his latest post, which inevitably opens me into a new moment, an other world, and an awareness of life so richly immediate.

Today’s post ‘return to go’ was a sharing of being aware, being busy, being aware of being busy, and remembering to, as they say in the Monopoly game, return to go. Also beautifully pointed to by Tiramit in this poem from Liu Wemin:

To be able to be unhurried when hurried;
To be able not to slack off when relaxed;
To be able not to be frightened
And at a loss for what to do,
When frightened and at a loss;
This is the learning that returns us
To our natural state and transforms our lives.
[Liu Wemin, 16th Century]

The day moved forward and by late morning I was sitting at my desk with pen and pencils in hand drawing whilst listening to Rupert Spira’s meditations – The light of pure knowing. As usual, I just let Rupert’s words and guidance wash over me as I disappear into my world of ‘contemplative doodling’, staying open to a line or two that may drop into awareness. Sure enough. The line dropped in: … having apparently forgotten your true nature. And I knew this would become the title of today’s drawing. A beautiful pointer to remembering to stop, drop in, and acknowledge the ‘true nature’.

Thanks to Today, Tiramit and Rupert… Mx

exquisite circles

Plate from Die Radiolarien (Rhizopoda radiaria) – Ernst Haeckel [1862]
Plate from Die Radiolarien (Rhizopoda radiaria) – Ernst Haeckel [1862]
My fascination for circles continued last week when cruising around Facebook I came across a post on the awakened eye that pointed to a piece called ‘The Rhetoric of Weird Wonders Gleefully Carousing in Morphospace : The Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Flickr Collection.’ The name alone seemed a mouth-full and would normally have had me scrolling past with judgement of ‘too hard’, however the accompanying image stopped me in my tracks. What’s that… click! The screen flicked over to a blog called Data is Nature, and as much as I found the text a bit high brow for a quick scan, I was fascinated by the images of exquisite scientific illustration.

The author Paul Prudence writes in his post:
Scientific illustration, especially of a biological kind, reached an apex in terms of draughtsmanship and delicateness during 19th century before photography became widespread. Though the emphasis on these illustrations was on accuracy, utility and facsimile of biodiversity, the personal aesthetics of the artists inevitably wrestled their way into the frame. Ernst Haeckel’s brilliant illustrations are the canonical example of this kind of treatment. (continued here)

Phew!

On viewing and sitting with these illustrations there is no doubt they are of an exact scientific nature, however, for me it is the placement of the circles, and the subtle work of pencil that evokes an etherial beauty. Some forms appear feminine and organic, and yet a surprising element of the masculine and mechanical appear in others. All of which felt like a pointing to something deeper and perhaps beyond the duality of our world.

I found myself re-reading the post and trying to understand what Prudence was saying about Haeckel’s work. What does ‘canonical’ mean? When in doubt… Google it! The definition of CANONICAL FORM is ‘the simplest form of something’ in a mathematical context. I felt even more pulled into these drawings; bathing in their beauty, simplicity and form as captured by the artist.

Simplicity = Circles = Form in Beauty = Awareness (to me).

Mx

a circular nature

allow your mind to go to the forms, but allow your heart to remain in pure knowing- Melinda Blair Paterson

allow your mind to go to the forms, but allow your heart to remain in pure knowing – pen and pencil – 10mar15

we may go out into the world, but we never leave ourself

we may go out into the world, but we never leave ourself – pen and pencil – 18mar15

You, are that which is Aware of experience - Melinda Blair Paterson

You, are that which is Aware of experience – pen and pencil – 19mar15

the thought that was present two seconds ago has now disappeared - Melinda Blair Paterson

the thought that was present two seconds ago has now disappeared – pen and pencil – 27mar15

nothing prior, nothing after it, just vast spaces either side - Melinda Blair Paterson

nothing prior, nothing after it, just vast spaces either side – pen and pencil – 28mar15

getting back in the game - Melinda Blair Paterson

getting back in the game – pen and pencil – 07apr15

All drawing by Melinda Blair Paterson
Titles from words by Rupert Spira (except ‘getting back in the game’)

These recent works from my ‘contemplative doodling’ series seem to offer a theme of a circular nature. Mostly created whilst listening to Rupert Spira’s meditations, The light of pure knowing, and more recently my own internal musings. The life of an artist, especially for one with a strong intuitive pulse or inner compass as experienced here, is a constant source of wonder. Why is it I can just let the hand and pen have its way, or trust whatever chooses the next colour pencil; and who knows when the work is done? It’s all a mystery to the ‘me’ and a joy to the unknown. 🙂 Mx